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Raspberry-PI cluster 28 Core. So very close to powering this up. Still need to: – get a power adapter – review power-up procedures – review eMMC imaging process

Thanks to :

The Compute Module 4 is basically a Raspberry Pi 4 model B, with all the ports cut off. Instead of the ports, you plug the Compute Module into another board with its special board-to-board connectors. But the Compute module has a few other tricks up its sleeve:

  • Faster eMMC: It has optional onboard eMMC storage, which is now much faster than any microSD card I’ve tested
  • PCI Express: It drops the USB 3.0 interface for a PCI Express interface, meaning you can do some pretty cool things in lieu of having a couple USB 3.0 ports.
  • WiFi and U.FL: It has an external antenna connector for its wireless interface. What’s that? Oh yes, there’s now a version of the Compute Module with Bluetooth and WiFi!
  • More Options: There are now thirty two different Compute Module flavors to choose from, whether you want onboard WiFi or not, whether you want eMMC storage, or whether you want 1, 2, 4, or even eight gigabytes of RAM!

You can find all the details on the Raspberry Pi website, but here are the highlights:

The cheapest CM4 is the Lite version with 1 GB of RAM, no wireless, and no onboard storage, and that’ll run just $25.

The most expensive, creme-de-la-creme version, with WiFi, Bluetooth, 8 GB of RAM, and 32 GB of faster eMMC storage, costs $90.

But to use the Compute Module 4, you will either need to build your own board to integrate it, or buy the Pi Foundation’s new Compute Module 4 IO Board, which is an extra $35. This board turns your Compute Module 4 into a Pi 4 on steroids, because it has all the ports on a standard model B Pi and then some. The only thing lacking is built-in USB 3.0 ports, and that’s one of the differences that made me do a double-take.

I remember earlier this year, Eben Upton mentioned in a podcast that the Raspberry Pi would someday have its PCIe 1x interface exposed directly. And now it is!

How to Build an IMSI Catcher to Intercept GSM traffic

…or something like this:

Recently, there have been cases of using GSM hijacking + text message sniffing to steal bank cards. This article provides practical information on how to sniff the traffic of a GSM Network and will follow the structure below:
1. Background
2. Architecture of GSM
3. What is IMSI Catcher?
4. How IMSI Catcher works?
5. Hardware and Installation of tools
6. Capturing the GSM traffic
7. Detection of IMSI Catcher

1. Background
Before we delve deeper into the subject, some basic terminology and background information on GSM are provided below.
What is SDR?
Software Defined Radio is a radio broadcast communication technology, which is based on a software-defined wireless communication protocol instead of being implemented through hard-wires. SDR allows easy signal processing and experimentation with more complex radio frequency builds.
What is RTL-SDR?
RTL-SDR is a Realtek (RTL2832U) TV stick. TV sticks allow transmission of raw I/O samples, which can be used for DAB / DAB + / FM demodulation.

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bladeRF - USB 3.0 Software Defined Radio by Nuand — Kickstarter

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Active 4G LTE vulnerability lets hackers see texts, track locations, and  eavesdrop on conversations - Electronic Products

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